Kenya

Dear Kenya Power, blackouts are affecting our study time

Dear Kenya Power, blackouts are affecting our study time

Summary

  • The Kenya Power company has been unreliable.
  • We are often in the middle of a class and then the power goes off.
  • I am also not able to watch television to relax after I have studied.

My name is Jake. I am 13 years old and live in Kinungi Bonanza in Naivasha, Nakuru County.

Like many school-goers, I now study at home because the government closed schools to protect us from getting infected with Covid-19.

Our teachers have tried to ensure that we are up-to-date with the syllabus because I am in Class Eight and I will be sitting my national exams to join secondary when schools open.

We use Zoom for the classes.

Teachers also use WhatsApp to send us homework and then remind us to complete assignments. However, it has been extremely difficult for us to study because there are no lights to power the computer to see or at night when I want to do my homework.

Unreliable

The Kenya Power company has been unreliable.

We are often in the middle of a class and then the power goes off.

Recently, a transformer blew up near our home and affected electricity supply, and it took long before the people from Kenya Power came to check.

Since July, my parents and others from the area have been calling the company day in and day out, but they have not given us any response.

I am not the only pupil in Kinungi suffering because I know so many of my friends who study in other schools who have been affected.

Classes put on hold

Due to the blackout, our classes were put on hold hence we were left behind with not a single clue of what the rest have been studying. All we have been left with is our books, with no additional notes from the teachers.

Due to the power losses, we cannot carry out activities such as baking, which our school offers as part of home science even though we do not sit for exams for the subject.

I am also not able to watch television to relax after I have studied.

In the morning over the weekends, TV has some educational channels that I cannot watch now thanks to the blackouts.

I would also like to hear how far the government has reached with the fight against the coronavirus.

I am not the only one suffering.

I have often heard my parents complain that the food that they store in the fridge for us is going bad.

We are not able to study now, but the government is also losing because all of the families in Kinungi would have paid electricity bills.

Jake Gitari, 13, is a class pupil at Highpeak Junior Academy.            

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