Kenya

Laser Eye patients appeal to Uhuru for help

Laser Eye patients appeal to Uhuru for help

Summary

  • Sarit Centre argued that it gave Laser Eye Centre a one-year notice to vacate the popular mall.
  • The hospital’s founder Mukesh Joshi had unsuccessfully sued Sarit Centre to stop the eviction.
  • Laser Eye Centre sued after rejecting the conditions and terming them oppressive.
  • Tuesday, a group of 22 patients wrote to President Kenyatta, saying that they require urgent treatment.

Disgruntled patients at the Laser Eye Centre in Nairobi have appealed to President Uhuru Kenyatta to intervene in a tenancy row between the level four hospital and Sarit Centre.

They argue that some of them now risk going blind as they cannot get treatment elsewhere.

Laser Eye Centre was closed on August 1 after its lease with Sarit Centre expired.

The hospital’s founder Mukesh Joshi had unsuccessfully sued Sarit Centre to stop the eviction, saying he is unable to bring in specialists from the United States, India and Italy to move sensitive equipment to a new location.

Sarit Centre argued that it gave Laser Eye Centre a one-year notice to vacate the popular mall, and wanted to terminate the landlord-tenant relationship.

List of conditions

The mall had given a list of conditions, including upfront payment of one year’s rent and joint access of the premises with the hospital, before it could offer a one-year extension.

Laser Eye Centre sued after rejecting the conditions and terming them oppressive.

Tuesday, a group of 22 patients wrote to President Kenyatta, saying that they require urgent treatment from Dr Joshi as some procedures cannot be done anywhere else in Africa.

The patients say they have since August 1 been stranded as there is no alternative facility.

Peninah Ntong’ondu, one of the patients, says in the letter that her body has rejected a cornea that was implanted on her left eye at a different facility and that she also needs treatment to her right eye that has deteriorated over the last few months.

The patients say that Dr Joshi informed them that he is happy to move out of Sarit Centre once the travel bans are lifted.

The patients also sued Sarit Centre owners PBM Nominees last week for refusing to let Laser Eye Centre operate until travel bans are lifted and specialists can fly in to relocate the hospital’s equipment. They said the court needs to intervene because their potential loss of vision cannot be compensated with money.