Opinion

Restore lost glory of agricultural sector

Restore lost glory of agricultural sector

Failure of the current government to revamp agriculture makes the young generation to have little interest in the sector.

Photo credit: File | Nation Media Group

Agriculture under cash crop farming had significant effects on the economy since Independence. The government put in effort to raise and finance the sector more for stability in food production and manufacture.

Most agriculture-based industries could produce the best items used on the global stage. In addition, the population was sufficiently equitable by job opportunities. The industries opened up towns and cities, creating room for urbanisation.

The appreciation of agriculture encompasses much more to the values and growth of the country. The national heritage was preserved well on the global stage as based in coffee, tea and coffee production. The big deal was that cash crops gave independence to the economy. However, the prosperity that agriculture has brought to this nation over the years is underrated.

First, Kenya is struggling to keep in touch with farmers to revive the best policies to regain the strength of agriculture. Legislation on managing agricultural industries are discriminative. The potential of the sector to boost the economy was ignored during the privatisation of agriculture-based companies.

Parastatals that hosted agricultural institutions were sold to private owners without fully negotiating with the concerned farmers. Policies that ensured the loyalty of management to farmers and shareholders were flawed.

Although Kenya falls under the third world countries, a stable agricultural sector can give it an edge over many others.  Scientific innovation in agriculture must reflect the health of the market. Business can change but agricultural activities keep the economy alive in all aspects.

Failure of the current government to revamp agriculture makes the young generation to have little interest in the sector. Our health standards depend on how agriculture is handled.

Antony Oluchina, Vihiga

* * *


The government should channel more resources into sinking more boreholes for the residents of the northern part of the country and their livestock.

It is disheartening to note that the residents travel many kilometres into Uganda with their livestock just to look for water.

Water and food are often used as campaign tools in those regions before and during the electioneering period to woo voters. Unfortunately, once elected into office, the politicians don’t honour their part of the bargain.

It is also disturbing that few or no government schools have been established in those regions to bringthe residents up to speed with the rest of the country, increasing the rate of illiteracy.

Starting from next year’s general election, the citizens from the North should decide not to vote until a permanent solution to their hardship is found, so as to improve the situation.

Betty Juma, Kisumu